Sabona and Green Energy join forces with Second Life Project in Zimbabwe

Second Life Project Zimbabwe

Second Life Project installs solar boreholes in Zimbabwe to provide clean water for communities and gardens and improve health and living conditions

First installation of solar-powered borehole in Zimbabwe

Second Life Project: Sustainability in action

In Southern Africa, in Zimbabwe, Green Energy and Sabona, a grassroots aid organisation working for a better future for the people of Zimbabwe, have joined forces on a visionary project that not only ensures access to clean water, but also promotes sustainable development and economic growth. The project supports the UN Sustainable Development Goals and is a true story of transformation and hope.

New story with solar-powered boreholes

Before our work in Zimbabwe, women and children had to make an exhausting walk every day to collect water. Early in the morning, before the sun rises, they would start a seven to 25 kilometre walk, which often meant the children had to interrupt their schooling and the women their other chores. But with the installation of our solar-powered boreholes, this is now history. Clean water now flows freely, not only to quench thirst, but to pave the way for a brighter future.

Access to clean water

In Zimbabwe, many local communities suffer from lack of clean drinking water, which has serious consequences for health and quality of life. The solar-powered boreholes provide clean water to 500-1,000 people per borehole. This improved access to water not only strengthens hygiene and sanitation, but also reduces the spread of disease, which is crucial to achieve sustainable communities and improve living conditions.

Economic growth through vegetables

An important part of the project is to establish large vegetable gardens that are being watered with water from the solar-powered boreholes. These gardens not only ensure the local food supply, but also create economic opportunities by selling vegetables to nearby tourist hotels. Here, the boreholes are essential, as they provide the necessary water to hydrate these gardens, ensuring the nutrition and long-term development of the local community.

The gardens use simple water systems connected to wells or tanks, allowing more people to grow spinach, carrots, salads, cabbage and other vegetables. Fruit trees like mango, papaya and orange add variety to the local fruit offerings. Garlic has also been introduced due to its nutritional benefits.

A future built on sustainability

Our goal is more than providing clean water. By integrating solar energy and sustainable technologies, we can provide access to clean water and nutrition, but also support local economies and social equity. This project is not just a solution; it’s a story of change, a story of how we through our actions today are creating a better tomorrow for communities in Zimbabwe.

Second Life Project Zimbabwe
A day of joy for women in the community who now don’t have to walk far to bring water

Become part of the story

Want to be part of our journey towards sustainability and hope in Zimbabwe?

Contact us today to learn more about how you can support our Second Life Project and help create a more just and sustainable future for the local community. Together we can create positive change that transcends borders and generations.

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Liters of water dissipation / kWh produced

Lower is better

Data from: https://unece.org/sed/documents/2021/10/reports/life-cycle-assessment-electricity-generation-options (page 37-38)

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CIGS compared to poly-Si

Roof mounted

Land use / kWh produced

Lower is better

Data from: https://unece.org/sed/documents/2021/10/reports/life-cycle-assessment-electricity-generation-options (page 37-38)

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CIGS compared to poly-Si

Roof mounted

Ionising radiation emited / kWh produced

Lower is better

Data from: https://unece.org/sed/documents/2021/10/reports/life-cycle-assessment-electricity-generation-options (page 37-38)

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CIGS compared to poly-Si

Roof mounted

Carcinogenic effects / kWh produced

Lower is better

Data from: https://unece.org/sed/documents/2021/10/reports/life-cycle-assessment-electricity-generation-options (page 37-38)

Document

CIGS compared to poly-Si

Roof mounted

Freshwater eutrophication / kWh produced

Lower is better

Data from: https://unece.org/sed/documents/2021/10/reports/life-cycle-assessment-electricity-generation-options (page 37-38)

Document

CIGS compared to poly-Si

Roof mounted